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    Quotes for the default campaigns

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    lockie
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    Quotes for the default campaigns

    Post by lockie on Thu Jan 01, 2015 2:29 pm

    I`ve idea to replace current quotes with a new ones, which will be devoted to the tanks in the WW2.
    The total number of default quotes is 30.
    So, let's put in this topic what we've, then make the best selection.
    Here is mine:
    1. "Tanks must be fast. That, I would say, is the most important lesson of the war in regard to tank design. The Panther was on the right lines, as a prototype".
    2. "Fire-power, armor protection, speed and cross-country performance are the essentials, and the best type of tank is that which combines these conflicting requirements with the most success. In my opinion the German Panzer V, the 'Panther,' was the most satisfactory of all, and would have been close to the ideal had it been possible to design with a lower silhouette".

    Hasso von Manteuffel, General der Panzertruppen, commander of the German 7th Panzer Division (from Basil Hart's book `The Other Side of the Hill`).

    3. "Our guidelines were: "Shoot first, but if you can't do that, at least hit first." The prerequisite for that, of course, is fully functioning communications from tank to tank and also among the crew. Furthermore, quick and accurate gun-laying systems need to be present. In most instances, the Russians lacked both of these prerequisites. Because of that, they often came out on the short end of the stick, even though they frequently didn't lag behind us in armor, weapons, and maneuverability. With the "Josif Stalin" tanks, they were even superior to us".
    On July 8, we got hit. I had to bail out for the first time.
    We were in the lead. It was at Ulla, a village that was completely burned down. Our engineers had built a pontoon bridge next to the one blown up over the Duna. It happened like greased lightning. A hit against our tank, a metallic crack, the scream of a comrade, and that was all there was! A large piece of armor plating had been penetrated next to the radio operator's seat. No one had to tell us to get out. Not until I had run my hand across my face while crawling in the ditch next to the road did I discover that they had also got me. Our radio operator had lost his left arm. We cursed the brittle and inelastic Czech steel that gave the Soviet 47mm AT gun so little trouble. The pieces of our own armor plating and assembly bolts caused considerably more damage than the shrapnel of the round itself. My smashed teeth soon found their way into the trash can at the aid station.

    Oberleutnant Otto Carius, Tigers in the mud


    4. "The 5th Guards Tank Army met only with new types of the enemy tanks during tank battles from 12th July to 20th August 1943. On the battlefield there were mainly T-V ("Panther"), a considerable number of T-VI ("Tiger") as well as modernized tanks T-III and T-IV.
    Having commanded armored units from the early days of this World War, I have to report to you that our tanks today have lost their superiority over the enemy tanks in armor and weaponry. German tanks have much superior weapons, armor and targeting and only the exceptional courage of our tankers, and great concentration of our tank troops with artillery denied the enemy opportunity to use the full advantages of their tanks.
    The presence of powerful weapons, strong armor and good optic devices on German tanks put our tanks at a distinct disadvantage. The efficiency of our tanks is therefore greatly reduced and their failure is increased".


    Commander of the 5th Tank Army General-Lieutenant of the tank forces
    Rotmistrov P.A.
    From report to Marshal USSR Zhukov G.K., after Kursk Salient, 1943 August.


    5. "General Semyon Krivoshein's 1st Mechanized Corps was part of the 2nd Guards Tank Army. It crossed the Oder and attacked Berlin from the northeast. Yevsey Vaynrub's 219th Tank Brigade was part of Krivoshein's corps, which had fought in the capture of Bernau, and from there advanced to Berlin. On April 21 it reached the outskirts of Berlin and the following day captured the northeast fortified suburb of Weissensee. In fierce street fighting on April 27, the corps took the Siemensstadt areas northeast of the city and crossed the Spree River from north to south. For distinction in battle in Berlin, Krivoshein was awarded the title of Hero of the Soviet Union. Yevsey Vaynrub was also awarded the title of Hero of the Soviet Union, and his brigade received the honorary title Berlin Brigade".
    (from Yitzhak Arad's book `In the Shadow of the Red Banner: Soviet Jews in the War Against Nazi Gemany`)

    Generalleutnant Mauritz von Wiktorin (left), General der Panzertruppe Heinz Guderian (center) and Kombrig Semyon Krivoshein (right) at the German-Soviet joint parade in Brest on September 22, 1939.

    5. "... in it's capabilities - for armaments, manpower, strike power - a Red Army Tank Corps corresponds to five German infantry divisions. And if so, then we have the right and duty to impose on a Tank Corps the mission to destroy 1-2 tank divisions or 4-5 infantry divisions. What is the reason why I say 4-5 divisions with such certainty? This is because a Tank Corps with it's power will never fight at the same time with these five divisions, deployed and with their firepower turned against the Corps. Apparently, it will destroy these 5 divisions with a series of strikes, one after the other".
    Army General Pavlov D.G., Chief of the Red Army Auto-Armoured Control, from report "The use of mechanized troops in modern offensive operation", December 1940.

    (Great thanks to Tanker for proofreading).

    6. "We admired the courage and elan with which the Americans executed their attacks, even though we sometimes felt sorry for them at having to pay for the combat experience with such heavy losses. We discovered later, in Italy, and I personally in the battles in France in 1944, how quickly the Americans were able to evaluate their experience and, through flexible and unconventional conduct of a battle, convert it into results".
    Panzer Commander Oberst Hans von Luck (from his autobiography)


    7. "`Panther's' engine caught fire and the tank burned out. Our rubes point forward and to the flanks, we advance nervously, watching the trail...
    Two hundred meters after leaving the woods, we make a short halt. Suddenly, anti-lank weapons start shooting at us from a higher elevation. We react immediately and our radio position to the tanks remaining on the edge of the woods. Before we can receive new orders, our 'Panther' receives some hits and we take shelter in ... Very quickly, we leave in a group toward the village of Trostyanets 7 kilometers away... Suddenly, a large number of tank emerge in front of us. "Halte!": we hear on the radio. 'Fire on the left!" The action in short and violent. Some T-34s begin to burn. We are favored compared to the T-34 because our 'Panther' has thicker armor and our 75mm guns are surprisingly precise."

    Unteroffizier Peter Schamberger, the gunner on `Panther` 442, described the movement.

    8. "...we shoot at Soviet iron monsters (KV-1) from three sides, but everything was in vain. Soviet, on the contrary, provided effective fire. After a long battle, we had to retreat to avoid a complete encirclement. Soviet giants came closer and closer. One of them approached our tank, which was hopelessly stuck in a swampy soil. Without any hesitation the black monster went over our tank and pressed it into the dirt with it's tracks. At this moment a 150-mm howitzer arrived... The artillerists opened a direct fire on the tank and managed to hit it - it was like lightning struck. The tank stopped... Suddenly, someone from the guncrew hysterically screamed: "It moved again!" Indeed, the tank returned to life and began to approach to the gun. In the next minute the shiny metal tracks of the tank pressed howitzer in the ground like a toy..."
    Commander of the 41st Panzer Corps Wehrmacht General Georg-Hans Reinhardt, June 1941


    Last edited by lockie on Sat Jan 24, 2015 10:35 am; edited 17 times in total
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    frinik
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    Re: Quotes for the default campaigns

    Post by frinik on Thu Jan 01, 2015 6:40 pm

    I think we should use that quote from Lord Kitchener during WW1 as an example of miscalculation and lack of vision:

    Lord Kitchener (British Field Marshall during WWI) upon over seeing the trials of the tank, remarked that they were a "pretty mechanical toy but very limited military value.....
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    Re: Quotes for the default campaigns

    Post by woofiedog on Thu Jan 15, 2015 8:38 pm

    Slaughter at Halbe...

    For the Germans he estimates that the maximum strength of 9th Army in terms of Armored Vehicles was about 250 of which only about 200 were available for combat. He quotes the last report 9th Army sent to Army Group Headquarters on 24th April as being 79 Tanks in V Corps and 36 in XI SS Panzer Corps. In terms of manpower he cites Lieutenant-General Friedrich Bernhard the 9th Army's Rear area Commander. He put the total at 50,000 combat troops, 10,000 Volkssturm and, if totals of rear area troops are included then up to 150,000 men were trapped in the Halbe Pocket.

    The Panzer's last stand...

    As with Varosmajor Grange some hills like that of Sashegy were the cornerstone of the defensive line. If it fell it would allow Soviet observers to direct artillery fire on the enemy artillery positions situated between the citadel and the Castle Hill, thus preventing the use of the emergency airfield at Vermerzo. The German-Hungarian forces had therefore set up a defense in depth supported by flak guns and even a few Hetzer Jagdpanzer 38's.

    On February 11, Pfeffer Wildenbruch had obviously resolved his inner struggle concerning withdrawing from the city against Hitler's orders. Therefore he ordered his men to plan a breakout towards the northeast, starting from the Szell Kalman and Szena squares where he hoped by passing along the Margit boulevard then the forest and hills to reach the lines held by the 1st Kav Kps.

    Pfeffer Wildenbruch... No ammunition left, no rations left, Any resistance in Buda signifies unconditional surrender or being wiped out with no means to defend ourselves. I am against these two solutions. I am therefore withdrawing from Buda and will attempt to find a new base for the future operations.

    Hauptmann Helmuth Friedrich... It was Painful for a commander to see how this breakout attempt turned into madness and an animal like frenzy driven by a survival instinct.

    Officer of the 297th Rifle Division... The Hitlerites continued their advance towards the town exit despite their terrible losses, however they soon came up against our rocket launchers firing salvos at point blank range. It was a terrible sight.

    The Battle of Halbe - Blood & Honour...

    Tiger IIs of SS PzAbt. 502 to spearhead a desperate breakout on April 27th. Followed by the tens of thousands of soldiers and refugees, the column moved through woods and villages, being sitting ducks for the waiting Russians on both flanks. Many were wounded and/or taken prisoner. Losses were so high because the escape route was leading through dense fur forests and there were only a few escape routes leading to the West. Soviet shells exploded high above the ground so shrapnel and wood spliters of all sizes rained down on soldiers and refugees.

    The last two Tigers of SS PzAbt. 502 were lost on the first of May, when the decimated Kampfgruppe reached the 12th Army.

    Red Storm on the Reich: The Soviet March on Germany 1945...

    On 8 March 1945 Joseph Goebbels went to the scene of a battle in Silesia and saw how both the market place at Lauban and the road in and out of the town were littered with burnt-out enemy tanks. Our anti-tank guns had really done a good job here. Privately one is seized with horror at the sight of the monstrous, robot like steel colossi with which Stalin wants to subjugate Europe.

    Lelyushenko... The recent silence gave way to a general thundering, booming, crackling and whistling. Shells and mortar bombs fell on an area tens of kilometres wide and deep, from where there arose plumes of smoke, fire and dust compounded with snow. The ground quivered, and the very earth of the battlefield was blackened.

    Haupt... The Russian heavy and medium artillery was ranged literally wheel to wheel in concentrations of up to three hundred pieces per kilometer of front, and the first bombardment fell on the Fourth Panzer Army and the right-flanking Seventeenth Army at 0435. The air incandescent with an unnatural light, and before long a 'sky of fire and smoke lowered over the country on the west side of the Vistula. The frozen soil was torn up hundreds of times over, houses flared up like torches, bunkers collapsed, roads were broken up and men were ripped apart.

    Zündel: About the Forgotten Battle of Halbe...

    Then a distant rumbling started, and we could see huge clouds of black smoke bulging in the East. It sounded and it looked as though a thunderstorm was heading toward us.
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    Re: Quotes for the default campaigns

    Post by woofiedog on Sat Jun 27, 2015 8:42 pm

    A few quotes from the beginning stages of the "Tanks in the Hedgerows: Battle of Villers Bocage by Akhil Kadidal".

    And have to add a quote from the band CCR.

    Whoa thought it was a nightmare
    Lord it was so true

    They told me don't go walking slow
    The devil's on the loose

    Better run through the jungle
    Better run through the jungle
    Better run through the jungle
    Whoa don't look back to see

    Thought I heard a rumblin'
    Calling to my name

    Two hundred million guns are loaded
    Satan cries "take aim"

    Better run through the jungle
    Better run through the jungle
    Better run through the jungle
    Whoa don't look back to see

    Over on the mountain, thunder magic spoke
    Let the people know my wisdom
    Fill the land with smoke

    Better run through the jungle
    Better run through the jungle
    Better run through the jungle
    Whoa don't look back to see


    Then at mid-day on June 12, Dempsey made an important decision. A report from the 22nd Brigade summed up the choice: Because of the difficulty of the terrain and resulting slow progress...the 7th Armoured would Division would attempt to turn the enemy position on the left of the American sector. The Americans were already to the north of Caumont and there was a chance of exploiting a success towards Villers-Bocage and if possible to occupy Hill 113.

    At 3 o’ clock on the morning of June 7, the Tigers passed through Gournay-en-Bray and made for the Seine. They passed through Paris on June 8 but as they reached Versailles, Allied fighter-bombers struck. Several Tigers were damaged or knocked-out with nine men killed and eighteen wounded. Dispersing to mitigate further casualties, the battalion would not reach Villers-Bocage until the evening of June 12. When they finally reached their destination, they parked under the shady recesses of small woods south of N175 and exhausted by five nerve-wracking days on the road, collapsed into a stupor on the ground beside their Tigers, too weary to even go to sleep.

    Abruptly, to the left, he spotted an eight-wheeled German Sdkfz armoured car shadowing the convoy from an orchard. He quickly moved to warn the RHQ leader, Major Arthur Carr, only to see that Carr’s Cromwell had been overburdened by kit to such a degree that it could not even turn its turret onto the enemy. Pearce then warned the next tank, commanded by Lt. John Cloudsley-Thompson to take out their quarry, but by the time Cloudsley-Thompson could get into position, the German had vanished.

    The long column of British tanks and light armor crept up along the gently slanting Norman highway under the bright early-morning sun and came to a stop by the side of the highway. Nearby, barely two hundred yards away, sheltered beyond a tall line of trees and hedgerows, the crew of a German Tiger tank gaped in astonishment.

    As they clattered up the great winding road, flanked by Chestnut trees, nerves were on high alert. But at the many farms and hamlets along the way,locals appeared by the side to road to offer presents of fruit and wine. Several British officers took this opportunity to gain some raw intelligence from the locals on where the Germans were. But rumors made their way into actual details, particularly one that recounted that a German tank had been stranded without fuel at the Chateau de Villers-Bocage.

    Meantime at Pt. 213, the Rifle Brigade officers were summoned for new orders by Major James Wright, the CO of the Rifle Brigade’s A Company. A half track was sent to collect them, but someone had the presence of mind to point out that concentrating all of the officers in one vehicle was a mistake and so three halftracks went. While this conference was going on, the rest of troops went on standby. Suddenly Lt. Bill Garnett, one of the A Squadron troop leaders at the head of the column spotted a German staff car on the highway and opened up with his Besa machinegun. The car went spinning away from the road where it crashed in a field and caught fire.

    Despite the fact that the area was not secure, many of the crews emerged from their tanks and vehicles. They started to brew up their morning tea, lounged around smoking, or engaged in easy chatter. Although the riflemen posted sentries, none of them could see more than 250 yards on either side of the road.

    At the frontal tip was a Firefly from 2 Troop, commanded by Sgt. Stan Lockwood. One of his comrades, Sgt. Wally Allen, a Cromwell commander from 1 Troop parked his tank nearby and walked over to Lockwood to have a chat. As the smells of a pastoral French village swam in the air, Allen commented that that there as the smell of baking bread coming from one of the nearby shops. Up above them, the sky was wonderfully blue.

    Even as they watched, a sea of khaki figures enveloped the highway, smoking insouciantly and brewing up tea. SS Oberstrumfuhrer (Lieutenant) Michael Wittmann watched breathlessly. True, they had been told to expect a British probe in the area, towards the direction of the strategically important city of Caen about a dozen miles to the east, but not so quickly and not without warning. And now the British appeared to be relaxing, even settling down for the day.  “They’re acting as if they’d won the war already,” Wittmann’s gunner, Corporal Balthazar “Bobby” Woll said.

    Wittmann glared. “We’re going to prove them wrong,” he said. Ordering his company into the attack, he left three Tigers to guard his flanks and thundered onto the highway, guns blazing — beginning one of the most controversial and misunderstood tank actions of the war.


    Last edited by woofiedog on Sat Jun 27, 2015 9:16 pm; edited 2 times in total
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    Re: Quotes for the default campaigns

    Post by woofiedog on Sat Jun 27, 2015 9:00 pm

    A few more from the same source.

    But near the point, Wittmann, standing atop his turret, studied the panoramic view of the sight. Both the town and the rising highway were packed with British vehicles of all types: Sherman Fireflies, Cromwells, Stuart tanks, halftracks and towed anti-tank guns. The Germans were well inside Cranley’s forward screen, and Wittmann realized that his company was the sole opposition to the British drive eastwards. Yet he was hardly ready to attack. The bulk of the 101st SS Panzers had not arrived.

    Despite an official establishment strength of 15 Tigers in 2nd Company, only six of Wittmann’s Tigers had not broken down and had reached the battlefield. But upon arrival, Wittmann’s own tank (No. 205) had broken down because of transmission troubles, and then Lt. Wessel had gone to Panzer Lehr headquarters to establish contact with that division. To compound matters, Sgt. Lötzsch’s Tiger had a damaged a track and the Sgt. Stief ’s engine had started to overheat.

    Borrowing Tiger No. 212 commanded by First Sergeant Kurt Sowa and taking on one of his Tiger commanders, Sgt. Bobby Woll, an old comrade from the Eastern front, as his gunner, Wittmann decided to attack with what he had. “I had no time to assemble my company,” he later said. “...I had to act quickly, as I had to assume that the enemy had already spotted me and would destroy me where I stood.

    I set off with one tank, having given the others orders not to retreat but to stay where they were and hold their positions.”At 9:05, he burst out of his hiding place and clattered towards the N175. Up until this point, the British had been oblivious to the presence of the Germans but when Wittmann turned into the highway, Sergeant O’Conner of the Rifle Brigade, who was travelling towards Pt. 213 in a halftrack, spotted him. Instantly breaking radio silence, O’Conner would give the British the only warning that they received of the attack. But it was already too late.

    The first 88mm shell had already struck a nearby Cromwell which was attempting to position itself. A second tank, a formidable Sherman Firefly, the only tank which could have defeated Wittmann’s ambitions at this critical stage, rumbled on to the center of the highway and began to turn its turret. Wittmann’s gunner, Bobby Woll opened fire. The shell punched through the Firefly with a deafening crack, blowing up the unfortunate British machine whose blazing wreck now blocked the highway to Pt.213.

    The first 88mm shell had already struck a nearby Cromwell which was attempting to position itself. A second tank, a formidable Sherman Firefly, the only tank which could have defeated Wittmann’s ambitions at this critical stage, rumbled on to the center of the highway and began to turn its turret. Wittmann’s gunner, Bobby Woll opened fire. The shell punched through the Firefly with a deafening crack, blowing up the unfortunate British machine whose blazing wreck now blocked the highway to Pt.213.

    Milner later recalled that, “the enemy attended first of all to the three motor platoons by....trundling back towards Villers, shooting up vehicles and riflemen section by section, with only the company’s two 6-pdr anti-tank guns able to offer even a measure of resistance, which I learned afterwards they did with considerable bravery but with little effect.”
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    Re: Quotes for the default campaigns

    Post by woofiedog on Tue Jul 07, 2015 7:06 am

    Some quotes from the Battle of the Hedgerows: Battle of Villers-Bocage. By Arkhil Kadidal.

    At 1 p.m., the raiders went into action, diesel engines roaring as the armada of Tigers and Panzer IV’s rumbled out of their positions and towards the town. Corporal Leo Enderle of the regiment’s 6th Company later recounted: “Before the counterattack started we followed the road along which lay the wrecks of tanks and transport vehicles. When I stuck my head out of the tank I could also see dead bodies.”

    The withdrawals took place as rumors of a tremendous catastrophe filtered back to the other units of the 7th Armoured, infusing jittery nerves along its length. Most of the men in the rear had no inkling of what had really happened in Villers-Bocage. Corporal Peter Roach, a British scout car commander remembered hearing that evening that, “the leading regiment...had run into real trouble.

    The withdrawals continued from 6 p.m. to 8 o’clock that night, with the survivors retreating towards a defensive “Brigade Box” at Tracey-Bocage. The last to leave were tanks of the 4th CLY. Just as the Allied bombardment was cover their exit, Sergeant Lockwood’s Firefly stalled.“I can’t start the bloody thing,” Lockwood’s driver shouted frantically.The bombardment was supposed to begin at any moment and Lockwood considered abandoning the Firefly. To his relief, Sergeant Bill Moore leapt down from the turret of his following tank and despite the sniping and machine-gun fire, drew a cable link from his tank to the Firefly. They got out just in time.

    The Germans harried some of the retreating British all the way back to Tracey-Bocage and another battle raged for the next two and a half hours. The irritating German infantry were finally suppressed at 10:30 that night and when they were gone, the troopers of the 22nd Brigade settled in the “box,” angry and exhausted.

    Losses were high for the “Desert Rats,” although there is some confusion on the actual figures. The 22nd Armoured Brigade lost 217 men killed, wounded and missing, most of whom were taken prisoner after the Germans cut off and captured the point.

    The Rifle Brigade lost about 80 men, of which nine had been killed and the rest captured. The 4th CLY lost 85 men, with about 4 to 12 killed, five wounded and the rest missing or captured. The 1/7th Queen’s had suffered 37 men gravely wounded and seven men killed in combat — a remarkably small number.

    Two men from the 5th RHA had also died. Beside the human casualties, the loss of material was staggering. The 22nd Armoured Brigade had lost 21 Cromwell tanks, 4 Sherman Fireflies and 3 Stuarts. The list of other vehicles lost included 14 halftracks, six to 14 universal carriers, three Humber scout cars, three OP artillery-control tanks, nine Daimler Dingo armoured cars and two Six-Pounder guns.
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    Re: Quotes for the default campaigns

    Post by woofiedog on Wed Jul 08, 2015 3:23 am

    Quotes concerning the 12th SS-Panzer-Division "Hitlerjugend" in Normandy, an article written by Jon Latimer for the "World War II" magazine.

    http://www.historynet.com/world-war-ii-12th-ss-hitlerjugend-panzer-division-fought-in-normandy.htm

    They were the cream of German youth, but they were babies. In the 1st Battalion, for example, 65 percent were under 18 years old. Only 3 percent were over 25, and almost all of these older soldiers were officers and noncoms. Organized in Antwerp, Belgium, in July 1943, the 12th SS Hitlerjugend Division, of which the 25th was part, had been formed around a cadre of veterans from the 1st SS Panzer Division, the army and the Luftwaffe.

    Most of its personnel came from the Hitler Youth leadership schools, and it was not uncommon to have boys of 16 in its ranks. ‘We could foresee what lay ahead,’ recalled one older veteran. ‘The fine young grenadiers by contrast glanced smiling at us. They had no fear, full of confidence, trusting in their strength and innate aggression. How willing will these youngsters be to stand the test?’

    At 5 o’clock on the afternoon of June 6, 1944, the division’s 229 tanks and assault guns, 658 armored vehicles, some 2,000 soft-skinned vehicles and 20,540 men moved off along three routes. ‘We’ll soon give it to Tommy!’ was the banter remembered by Corporal Helmuth Pock as the boys traveled to the front. Despite the overall exuberance, Pock recalled that many of the youngsters were smoking cigarettes to steady their nerves.

    Meyer had three Panzergrenadier battalions in the line with two companies of tanks behind each flank and artillery in support. He was also told that the 21st Panzer Division had been ordered to form up on his right flank. Watching the Canadian advance unfold from the tower of Ardenne Abbey, he could see an opportunity opening in front of him.

    At 10 a.m. on June 7, the 50 Mark IV tanks of the 2nd Battalion, 12th SS Panzer Regiment, arrived and moved into position. The 1st Battalion, with its powerful PzKw. Mark V Panthers, was stranded and momentarily idled east of the Orne River for want of fuel.

    It was at that moment that the German youngsters could hear Meyer’s voice over the radio net, ordering them to advance. Engines roared to life and tracks squeaked as the 12th SS received its initiation.

    ‘It cracked and flashed around Franqueville,’ recalled a German soldier. ‘The lead enemy tanks began smoking, and I saw how the crews bailed out. Other tanks exploded in pieces in the air. A Panzer Mark IV suddenly stopped, burning, tongues of flame shooting out of the turret.’

    Canadian anti-tank guns hit four or five of the tanks, and the Hitlerjügend crews’ inexperience showed as they turned away while trying to retire. Hans Fenn’s tank was one of those hit: ‘The shell tore off the tank commander’s leg–SS Scharführer [Sergeant] Esser–but I heard he got out of the turret later,’ Fenn recalled. ‘Phosphorus shells caused the tank to instantly burst into flames all over. I was helpless….I made my way back with third degree burns, toward our grenadiers following up. They recoiled from me on sight, as if they had seen a ghoul.’

    Meanwhile, the 1st and 2nd battalions were approaching Cambes. ‘Until Cambes, everything went well,’ Emil Werner remembered. ‘So far as we were concerned, the village looked fine. But on the outskirts we came under infantry fire and then all hell broke loose.’ Two men were killed, but the tankers still had not seen any enemy soldiers.

    Although their situation was now precarious, the boys of the 12th were reluctant to withdraw. A company commander described the difficulty of extricating exposed sections that, having fought their way forward, would not retire: ‘All had the will to reach the sea. It was difficult to get them back on the leash again. The order to fall back was met with disbelief, and as a result was followed only after a long delay.’ Some witnesses later said that they came across boys from the division crying over their failure to force the Allies back into the sea.

    The 12th’s headquarters, positioned some 27 kilometers southwest of Caen, came under heavy and sustained naval gunfire on June 16, killing the commander, Brig. Gen. Fritz Witt, and several other senior officers. So determined had his attacks been since the invasion that Meyer was given command of the division.

    The 12th was now deployed in detachments north and west of Caen, and like the rest of the German army, was suffering from shortages of ammunition, fuel and equipment. To the north of Caen, some of its panzers supported unreliable units such as the 16th Luftwaffe Field Division. To the west, a flak battery and 15 tanks, together with the 1st Battalion, 26th SS Panzergrenadier Regiment, held the important Carpiquet airfield.

    British General Sir Bernard Law Montgomery, commander of the 21st Army Group, now began a series of attacks intended to push the Germans out of Caen once and for all. He hoped that seizure of the city would draw the bulk of the German armor to the eastern side of the Allied beachead and create the conditions for the breakout by the Americans in the west.

    The remains of 12th SS Panzer escaped the Falaise Pocket in September 1944; only 600 survived. No tanks or supplies came with them. The Division was reformed with younger volunteers and draftees. It supported the Ardennes Offensive and fought in Hungary. On May 8, 1945, numbering just 455 soldiers and one tank, the 12th SS Panzer Division Hitlerjugend surrendered to the US 7th Army.
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    Re: Quotes for the default campaigns

    Post by woofiedog on Wed Jul 15, 2015 6:06 am

    Quotes on German antitank tactics, self-propelled antitank.

    A report on German antitank tactics from a captured document, from Tactical and Technical Trends, No. 51, October 1944.

    http://www.lonesentry.com/articles/ttt/german-antitank-tactics.html

    Self-propelled antitank guns can be employed only on open flanks if adequately covered by infantry. Whenever possible, ground reconnaissance, preferably on foot, must precede the occupation of positions.

    Self-propelled antitank guns use fire and movement, their constant readiness for action making them the ideal mobile reserve. They are, therefore, the very weapon to use at points of main effort.

    On the move, one self-propelled antitank half-platoon should be as far forward as possible; the remainder of the platoon should be with the advance party. The rest of the company will remain together. Road reconnaissance must include investigation of the carrying capacity of bridges.

    In an attack, the infantry will be accompanied by self-propelled antitank platoons, each giving the other mutual support. The enemy should be engaged by surprise, when possible from defiladed positions or from positions on reverse slopes, with all guns firing simultaneously.

    Fire should be opened, when possible, by whole companies, since it will frequently be necessary to fire in several directions at the same time. Platoons can fire effectively only in one direction at a time.

    The only completely successful method of employing self-propelled companies is in mobile operations. Flank attacks are very effective, especially if they are combined with a small frontal attack.

    In defense, the main task of self-propelled antitank guns is the destruction of tanks which have broken through. Self-propelled units will therefore be held as mobile reserves and employed all together, especially for the point of main effort. An efficient warning system, using radio whenever possible, is especially important.

    Gun commanders must thoroughly reconnoiter probable operational areas, the ground in the main defensive belt, tank approaches, and the rear areas of the position. Close liaison with the infantry is essential. It is wrong to dig in self-propelled guns because of their lack of traverse, but firing and alternative positions must be prepared for them.
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    Re: Quotes for the default campaigns

    Post by woofiedog on Fri Aug 21, 2015 5:05 pm

    Film footage taken during Fall Blau/Case Blue or Operation Braunschweig. The video has some very good action footage taken during battle of artillery bombardment of a Panzer unit. [1:39 - 2:03]



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    Re: Quotes for the default campaigns

    Post by woofiedog on Sat Sep 05, 2015 11:17 pm

    Quotes from the article concerning the Kasserine Pass Campaigns February 19 thru 24, 1943. These are taken from the opening phases of the battle.

    The Kasserine Pass Battles

    http://www.history.army.mil/books/staff-rides/kasserine/vol-i-part_1.pdf

    Quotes, Allied.

    The future participants in the Battle of Kasserine Pass were those who had engaged in almost no active operations. They saw their performance against the French as more than adequate for success against the Germans and Italians. Confident of their underpowered light tanks with 37-mm guns, trusting the power of the 57-mmand 75-mm guns on their Shermans, they believed themselves to be blooded and tried in action.

    To stop German massed armor, the War Department created the tank destroyer, so named to connote offensive and aggressive characteristics as opposed to the defensive and passive meaning of, "antitank." A "marriage ofthe artillery gun to truck and tractor," the tank destroyer was to embody an aggressive spirit and to destroy enemy tanks by maneuver and fire.

    The French authorities in North Africa, after agreeing to a truce, joined the British and Americans who, by then,in accordance with prior plans,had turned eastward from Algeria, entered Tunisia and were driving toward Bizerte and Tunis, their ultimate objectives.

    The Allies deployed in Tunisia with the bulk of their strength in the north. Because of bad weather and supply deficiencies, Eisenhower on 24 December called off the offensive toward Bizerte and Tunis.

    On the morning of 31 January, more than twenty-four hours after the German attack, McQuillin committed a small-tank infantry force under Col.Alexander N. Stark, Jr., to strike to Faid and another such force under Col. William B. Kern to go for Rebaou. Late getting under way,the effort was badly coordinated and too weak to attain the objectives

    On the Allied side, Eisenhower questioned Fredendall's competence, Anderson doubted the battle worthiness of American troops, Fredendall wondered whether Ward was proficient, McQuillin castigated Stark, and so it went down the line. American ineptitude and failure to rescue the French defenders at Faid had shocked the French.


    Quotes, Axis.

    Axis troops had entered Tunisia from Italy shortly after TORCH,and eventually a field-army-size force, under General Juergenvon Arnim,built up an extended bridgehead covering Bizerte and Tunisin the north-eastern corner.

    Von Arnim sought to prevent the Allies from overrunning Tunisia and also to permit Rommel's army to finish withdrawing from Libya into southern Tunisia.

    Toward the end of January 1943, as Rommel settled into the Mareth Line in southern Tunisia, the Axis desire for the other passes initially spurred what developed into the Battle of Kasserine Pass.

    Rommel established his headquarters in southern Tunisia on 26 January, and two days later Comando Supremo in Rome approved a cautious push to take the Fondouk and Faid Passes and to advance on Gafsa.

    With Rommel's 10th and 21stPanzer Divisions temporarily under Von Arnim's control, Von Arnim attacked on 30 January to open the Battle of Kasserine Pass.

    Just before dawn, thirty tanks struck 1,000 French troops in the Faid Pass while another contingent of German tanks, infantry, and artillery drove through the Rebaou defile ten miles to the south, overran several hundred French defenders, and came up behind the French holding Faid. Encircled and outnumbered, the French fought gallantly for more than twenty-four hours until they were overwhelmed.

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    Re: Quotes for the default campaigns

    Post by woofiedog on Sat Sep 05, 2015 11:42 pm

    Color film combat footage [land battle starts at 1:30] from the Kasserine Pass Battle.



    More color film footage from the Tunisian Campaign.

    Below [land footage starts at 13:20].

    Also, did anyone notice the train crew members and the inscription chalked on the side of train?

    Our Bluebird. Bombed and machinegun to Hell, But still kicking!  Cool



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    Re: Quotes for the default campaigns

    Post by woofiedog on Sun Sep 06, 2015 8:08 pm

    Kasserine Pass Battles

    http://www.history.army.mil/books/staff-rides/kasserine/vol-i-part_1.pdf

    Quotes

    Feb 14th, During a raging sandstorm, more than 200 German tanks, half-tracks, and guns of both panzer divisions came through Faid. One task force swung around the northern side of Lessouda andencircled the hill; another swung around the southern side of Ksaira and surrounded the height. Waters' and Drake's forces, Fredendall's blocking positions, were thus marooned.

    Hightower went into action with forty-seven tanks. Although outnumbered, he fought bravely against the more effective German tanks. By mid-afternoon, all but seven of his tanks had been destroyed.

    During the engagement, some American artillerymen panicked and abandoned their guns. The 1st Armored Division Reconnaissance Battalion,ready to rescue Drake's men on Djebel Ksaira, was unable to even start its counterattack because some of the German tanks surrounding Drake had thrust forward toward Sidi bou Zid and captured a reconnaissance company.

    The rest of the American reconnaissance units then pulled out and headed for Sbeitla.

    Hightower's remnants, artillery pieces, tank destroyers, engineer trucks, and foot soldiers-fled toward Sbeitla. McQuillin re-established his command post there and began to assemble and reorganize his units.

    Initial estimates of losses on that day were shocking: 52 officers and morethan 1,500 men missing. The final numbers of casualties on 14 February weremuch smaller: 6 killed, 32 wounded, and 134 missing. But between Faid and Kern's Crossroads on the Sbeitla plain, forty-four tanks, fifty-nine half-tracks, twenty-six artillery pieces, and at least twodozen trucks were wrecked, burning, or abandoned.

    An artillery commander, Charles P. Summerall, Jr.,took his men out during the night to recover guns, trucks, and ambulances; on the following morning, he had eight instead of his normal twenty-four pieces-the others were lost-backing the troops at Kern's Crossroads.
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    Re: Quotes for the default campaigns

    Post by woofiedog on Fri Dec 04, 2015 7:50 am



    https://en.wiki2.org/wiki/Operation_Kutuzov

    For Operation Kutuzov, the Soviet's launched a counter-offensive upon the Orel salient in the north, starting on July 12th. This attack threatened the flank and rear of Model's 9th Army.

    The Bryansk Front and Western Front commenced the attack along the north and northeast sectors held by the 2nd Panzer Army. The spearhead sustained heavy casualties, but achieved significant penetration into the German line. This, in turn, threatened an encirclement of the 9th Army, as well as severing German supply routes. Model was forced to withdraw in response. The German front, which started at 45 km wide, dropped to just a 2 km wide advance in the north.


    Some of the Soviet commanders were displeased with the results, complaining that an even greater victory might have been won. Said Marshal Rokossovsky: "Instead of encircling the enemy, we only pushed them out of the bulge. The operation would have been different if we had used our force for two heavy punches which met at Bryansk". Zhukov held a similar opinion.

    Nevertheless, Operation Kutuzov was successful in diverting German reserves earmarked for Operation Citadel. In addition, the Soviets reduced the Orel salient and inflicted substantial losses on the German army, setting the stage for the liberation of Smolensk. More importantly, with Operation Kutuzov the Soviets seized the Strategic Initiative, which they would hold through the remainder of the war.

    Orders of the Day on the Red Army's Victories, July 24 - September 25,1943

    Order of the Day,  July 24, 1943

    Issued by Marshal Stalin and addressed to Army-General Rokossovsky, Army-General Valutin and Colonel-General Popov

    http://www.13thguardspoltavaskaya.com/history.html

    Yesterday, on July 23, as the result of the successful operations of our troops, the complete liquidation of the German July offensive was accomplished in the areas south of Orel and north of Byelgorod in the direction of Kursk.

    On the morning of July 5 the German-fascist troops, with large forces of tanks and infantry, supported by large air forces, passed to the offensive in the Orel-Kursk and Byelgorod-Kursk directions. The Germans hurled into attack against our troops their main forces, concentrated in the areas of Orel and Byelgorod.

    As is now clear, the German Command sent into action: in the Orel-Kursk direction—seven tank, two motorized and eleven infantry divisions; and in the Byelgorod-Kursk direction—ten tank, one motorized  and seven infantry divisions. Thus altogether the enemy hurled into attack  seventeen tank, three motorized and eighteen German infantry divisions.

    Concentrating these forces on narrow sectors of the front, the German Command reckoned, by concentric blows from the north and from the south in the general direction towards Kursk, on piercing our defences, and on encircling and  wiping out our troops stationed along the arc of the Kursk salient.

    This new German offensive did not take our troops unawares. They were prepared not only to repulse the German offensive, but also to deal mighty  counter-blows. At the cost of tremendous losses in man-power and equipment, the enemy succeeded in driving a wedge into our defences to a depth of about nine kilometres (six  miles) in the Orel-Kursk direction and of 15 to 35 kilometres in the Byelgorod-Kursk direction.

    In fierce engagements our troops wore down and bled white the picked German divisions, and followed this up by violent counterblows by which they not only hurled back the enemy and completely restored the position they had occupied before July 5, but also broke through the enemy’s defences and advanced 15 to 25 kilometres towards Orel.

    The battles fought for the liquidation of the German offensive have demonstrated the high military skill of our troops. Unprecedented examples of stubbornness,  steadfastness and heroism have been displayed by the men and commanders of all arms, including artillery and mortar gunners, tankmen and airmen.

    Thus, the German plan for a summer offensive can be considered as having failed completely. Thus the legend that in a summer offensive the Germans are always successful, and that the Soviet troops are compelled to retreat, is refuted.

    In the fighting for the liquidation of the German offensive, the troops  of Lt.-Gen. Pukhov, Lt.-Gen. Galinin, Lt.-Gen. of Tank Forces Rodin, Lt.-Gen.  Romanenko, Lt.-Gen. Kolpakchi, Lt.-Gen. Chistyakov, Lt.-Gen. of Tank Forces  Katukov, Lt.-Gen. of Tank Forces Rotmistrov, Lt.-Gen. Zhadov, Lt.-Gen. Shumilov, Lt.-Gen. Kryuchenkin, and airmen of air formations under Col.-Gen. of Aviation Golovanov, Lt.-Gen. of Aviation Krasovsky, Lt.-Gen. of Aviation Rudenko and Lt.-Gen. of Aviation Naumenko, particularly distinguished themselves.

    During the engagements from July 5-23, the enemy suffered the following losses: Officers and men killed, over 70,000; tanks destroyed or disabled, 2,900; self-propelling guns, 195; field guns, 844; planes destroyed, 1,392; and motor vehicles, over 5,000.

    I congratulate you and the troops under your command on the successful liquidation of the German summer offensive. I express my gratitude to all men, commanders and political workers of the troops under your command for their excellent operations.

    Immortal glory to the heroes who fell in the fight for the freedom and honour of our Motherland!


    A web site that has some July 1943 radio news broadcast concerning "Operation Kutuzov".

    http://billdownscbs.blogspot.com/2014/01/1943-operation-kutuzov.html

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    Re: Quotes for the default campaigns

    Post by 33lima on Fri Dec 04, 2015 11:22 pm

    From 'Overlord', by Max Hastings:

    'How does a Churchill get a Panther?' 'It creeps up on it. When it reaches close quarters the gunner tries to bounce a shot off the underside of the Panther's gun mantlet. If he's lucky, it goes through a piece of thin armour above the driver's head.' 'Has anyone ever done it? 'Yes. Davis in C Squadron. He's back with headquarters now, trying to recover his nerve.' 'How does a Churchill get a Tiger?' 'It's supposed to get within 200 yards and put a shot through the periscope.' 'Has anyone ever done it?' 'No.' Un-named British tank commander, Normandy, June 1944
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    Re: Quotes for the default campaigns

    Post by 33lima on Fri Dec 04, 2015 11:30 pm

    This is another quote from 'Overlord' and it could become the quote before StuG campaign mission 9, because it is from the battle for Hill 226 on 31 July 1944, on which mission #9 is broadly based.

    'The officers were assembling for an Orders Group in a wood when they heard a huge explosion and saw a pillar of smoke in the distance. The second-in-command, Major Sidney Cuthbert, said 'I'll go over and see what's happening,' and dashed across the ridge in his tank, followed by Whitelaw in a second. Suddenly, Whitelaw saw the turret of Cuthbert's Churchill lifted bodily into the air.'


    Last edited by 33lima on Sat Dec 05, 2015 12:09 am; edited 1 time in total
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    Re: Quotes for the default campaigns

    Post by 33lima on Fri Dec 04, 2015 11:51 pm

    From 'Mailed Fist' by Churchill troop leader John Foley, from the Battle of the Orne in August 1944:

    'McGinty had just got off the third round when the Tiger gunner recovered from his surprise. I was peering forward through the gloom when suddenly, and without any noise that I can remember, a sharp spike of yellow flame stabbed out of the muzzle of the 88mm gun in front of us. Sparks flew from the front of Avenger, and she reared back on her hind sprockets, the nose lifting slightly off the ground. A sudden heat singed the back of my neck and a rapid glance over my shoulder showed flames and smoke pouring from the engine hatches. 'Bale out - round the back of the tank!' I hollered.'

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    Re: Quotes for the default campaigns

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